Arcadia University

Peace studies at Arcadia University largely centers on its master’s degree program in international peace and conflict resolution, and is included in this list only because of its programs that allow undergraduates special and accelerated access to its graduate program. The graduate program’s curriculum is based on theory and practice in conflict analysis, management and resolution.

Qualified undergraduates can consult with their advisors and receive assured acceptance into the master’s program, typically after majoring in a social sciences or humanities field. Arcadia also offers a selective five-year B.A./M.A. program in international peace and conflict resolution. Students in this program complete the requirements for an undergraduate major either in international studies (including a required study abroad) or political science within three years before transitioning to graduate-level coursework. The graduate program also requires study abroad. It “is designed to produce graduates who are well-prepared for mid-level positions in a wide variety of government agencies and non-governmental organizations.”

Program director:

Amy S Cox, PhD
coxa@arcadia.edu
267-620-4752

Butler University

Butler University offers an interdisciplinary major and minor in peace and conflict studies. The major requires 36 credit hours of study, including six hours of internship or service-learning, intended for students “interested in issues of violence, conflict, social justice, ecological integrity, human rights and peace.”

Core courses within the major include community mediation and international conflict and peacebuilding. Internship and service-learning opportunities in Indianapolis include the American Friends Service Committee, Earth Charter Indiana, the Peace Learning Center, and the Borgen Project to abolish global poverty. This curriculum requirement can also be fulfilled through a semester internship in Washington D.C. or a study abroad experience. Butler University “strongly encourages” its students to study abroad in one of the programs offered in more than 40 countries.

Program Director:
Dr. Craig Auchter
auchter@butler.edu
(317) 940-9571

Canadian Mennonite University

Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) offers an undergraduate major in peace and conflict transformation studies focusing on conflict analysis and exploring “alternative ways of dealing with conflict that develop healthy relationships and prevent violence.” Both three- and four-year B.A. programs are offered.

The curriculum for the four-year B.A. in peace and conflict transformation studies requires two introductory courses and a senior seminar. Remaining coursework is drawn from long lists of electives grouped by two thematic areas: analyzing peace and violence, and peacebuilding. There is also a credit requirement for practical training in a peace skills field, such as mediation or nonviolent direct action, as well as a practicum in a relevant placement. The three-year B.A. is identical except that fewer credits are needed.

Building on over 25 years of experience in delivering undergraduate programs in conflict resolution, peace, and international development studies, CMU now offers a Master of Arts in Peacebuilding and Collaborative Development that blends these core themes, designed both for practitioners and for those pursuing academic studies.

CMU also sponsors the Canadian School of Peacebuilding, which offers intensive summer courses on topics relevant to peacebuilders from around the world, and publishes Peace Research: The Canadian Journal of Peace and Conflict Studies.

Program contact:
Wendy Kroeker
wkroeker@cmu.ca
(204) 487-3300

 

Colgate University

Students majoring in the peace and conflict studies program, founded at Colgate University in 1970, focus on one of three specialty areas: collective violence, human security or international social justice. The 11-course curriculum advances through four levels, beginning with introductory classes to peace and conflict study and theory. In the second and third levels, majors choose one of the three specialties and then focus on a specific region of the world. The fourth level consists of a thesis integrating all the previous levels of study.

Students are “strongly encouraged” to study abroad in the regions they choose as a focus during the third level of study. Over the past three years, peace and conflict studies students have studied abroad in nearly 30 countries, either through Colgate-affiliate programs or other approved options. Colgate also offers a six-course minor in peace and conflict studies. Colgate was founded in 1819 and has become a very selective university.

Program Chair:
Dr. Nancy Ries
nries@colgate.edu
(315) 228-7806

College of St. Benedict & St. John’s University

Students enrolled at the College of St. Benedict, a Catholic women’s college, and St. John’s University, a Catholic men’s college, take classes together under a joint academic program. In the peace studies department, students apply humanities and social sciences methods to the study of violence and peace.

Core courses for peace studies majors include classes on nonviolent struggle, mediation and conflict resolution, an internship and a capstone seminar. Additionally, each major takes elective courses in an individually developed focus, such as human rights, ethics of war, or public health.

For their internships, students spend a minimum of 160 hours in a placement relating to their focus area. This component of the curriculum, plus other “service-learning” activities, reflects the College of St. Benedict’s and St. John’s University’s emphasis on community-based education.

While the two schools, about six miles apart, share academics, they maintain separate campuses, athletic teams and other programs. Both universities emphasize Benedictine Catholic values, including peace, sustainability and community, in all facets of students’ lives.

Program Administrator:
Dr. Kelly Kraemer
kkraemer@csbsju.edu
(320) 363-2151

Conrad Grebel University College

Conrad Grebel University College is affiliated with the University of Waterloo. Students at Conrad Grebel receive undergraduate or graduate degrees from the University of Waterloo, a publicly funded institution.

Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS), a social justice-oriented discipline within the Faculty of Arts at the University of Waterloo, is both an undergraduate and Master’s degree program. “The mission of PACS is to educate students to pursue peace and justice in the context of diverse investigations into the origins and nature of conflict and violence. The program strives to educate, invigorate and mobilize students to make use of conceptual and/or practical models to imagine and build a culture of peace between individuals, in our communities, among nations and around the world.”

The peace and conflict studies undergraduate program is a dynamic 3 or 4 year BA in which theory and practice come together through unique instructors and diverse course offerings. PACS courses are taught by both practitioners in the field as well as committed and engaged faculty members who have assorted research interests and areas of expertise. Students can explore the world and career opportunities through the flexible Field Study option that can be done anywhere in the world. Students majoring in PACS will take a mix of PACS core courses and courses from a list of 120 offerings in 20 other departments that focus on issues of justice and peace from a different lens. This flexibility in core and elective courses allows students to tailor their degree to individual interests, including topics such as conflict resolution and mediation, violence and nonviolence, religion and culture in peacebuilding, and human rights and social justice.

Conrad Grebel also offers a distinctive interdisciplinary professional Master’s program in Peace and Conflict Studies that prepares students with the knowledge and practical skills needed to contribute to nonviolent peace building efforts. Placing a unique focus on the pivotal role that individuals within civil society play, the MPACS program explores the potential of civil society to advance peace through principled advocacy, effective programming, and dynamic engagement with the state and marketplace. A key focus of this program is to prepare students for careers as practitioners, through an optional internship in a local, national, or international setting. Student experiences range from working at Community Justice Initiatives (CJI) mediating disputes, to working as a support worker for refugees at FCJ Refugee Centre, to working for Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA) as a project consultant in Tanzania, and working for the United Nations in Cambodia, Switzerland, China and Thailand.

In addition to the academic program, the PACS department hosts a vibrant and growing Conflict Management Certificate Program, offering over 30 skills training workshops for both public and student interest. Workshops can be taken individually or as part of streams focusing on workplace, family or congregational conflict. The program has been part of the College since 1998, and has developed a strong reputation for consistency and quality, engaging leading field practitioners and academics, while responding to current issues and models of conflict resolution.

Program Director:
Lowell Ewert
lmewert@uwaterloo.ca
(519) 885-0220 ext. 24380

 

DePauw University

With courses drawn from more than 15 academic departments, the conflict studies program at DePauw University takes a broad approach to the study of different kinds of conflict, from the intrapersonal to the international levels. Conflict studies majors have significant freedom to choose their coursework, based on a learning contract students develop with their academic advisors early in the process. Each learning contract identifies two themes of study that a conflict studies major will pursue, such as international diplomacy and organizational conflict.

As seniors, conflict studies majors must take a seminar course that includes a significant research project. The topics of these senior seminars vary widely, depending on the instructor’s specialty and interests. DePauw also offers a five-course minor in conflict studies.

While the university maintains a nominal affiliation with the United Methodist Church, faith-based understandings of, or approaches to, the study of conflict are not an emphasis of the conflict studies program.

Coordinator:
Dr. Brett O’Bannon
bobannon@depauw.edu
(765) 658-4157

Earlham College

Earlham College offers a Peace and Global Studies, or PAGS, program that allows students to “explore strategies for constructing a just and peaceful world.” PAGS has a much larger core curriculum than many other colleges’ peace and conflict studies programs, made up of 9 required classes that begin with a series on economics, history, philosophy and politics. In addition to the core curriculum, PAGS majors pick a series of classes to form a concentration in one of the following areas: 1) Religious Pacifism; 2) Law & Justice; 3) Praxis (Social Movements); and 4) Fourth-Generation Peace Studies (drawing upon postcolonial theory).  PAGS majors must also complete an internship; a senior research project that includes a community presentation; and a senior thesis.

The program also emphasizes experiential learning through opportunities for semester-long study in Jordan, the U.S.-Mexico border region, or other opportunities, and/or through participation in the college’s many active student groups involved in progressive causes.

Earlham College is affiliated with the Society of Friends (Quakers), a traditional “peace church.”  Quaker values, including the quest for peace and justice, remain an important part of its institutional mission.

Program Director:
Dr. Joanna Swanger
swangjo@earlham.edu
(765) 983-1660

 

Eastern Mennonite University

Nonviolence, social justice and positive societal change are emphasized across the university’s entire curriculum and in its mission statement, as befits a university that maintains strong ties to one of the traditional “peace churches,” the Mennonite Church. Yet the university is clearly committed to educating people of all faiths in peacemaking theory and practice, as shown by its Center for Interfaith Engagement .

The undergraduate major in peacebuilding and development includes core studies of the theory and practice of social justice and social change, plus a series of classes in philosophy, political science, economics and contemporary issues of peace and justice. Many of the professors in the program, and the university in general, have lived in other countries and demonstrate commitment “to work for justice at home and around the world.” Majors must also complete a practicum, often through the Washington (D.C.) Community Scholars Program.

Eastern Mennonite University also offers a five-year accelerated MA in Conflict Transformation degree in collaboration with its Center for Justice and Peacebuilding (CJP). CJP offers a graduate program that draws peace practitioners from around the world to campus (Nobel Peace Laureate Leymah Gbowee is a graduate). It sponsors a variety of other peace and justice programs and initiatives, including an annual Summer Peacebuilding Institute, which hosts between 150 to 200 people from around 40 countries. With more than 2,800 participants in its 20 years of existence, SPI has initiated several similar initiatives around the world, 12 of which were featured in a 2015 issue of Peacebuilder magazine.

Founded in 1917, Eastern Mennonite University was an early proponent of requiring all students to participate in cross-cultural studies; the majority of students spend a semester abroad through one of the university’s many cross-cultural programs. 

Contact:

EMU Undergrad Admissions Dept., (800) EMU-COOL
-or- CJP Graduate Admissions, cjp@emu.edu, (540) 432-4490

Goshen College

Affiliated with the Mennonite Church, Goshen College offers a major in peace, justice and conflict studies that is “rooted in Anabaptist-Mennonite theology and history.” The program looks at conflict from a range of perspectives, from issues of international war and peace to “applying peacemaking perspectives and skills to personal relationships and all aspects of community life.” In addition to required courses on Biblical Themes of Peace and Mediation, majors choose from a variety of classes on peace and justice topics and skills, as well as courses in economics, political science and history. An internship experience is also required for majors.

Goshen College also offers minors in conflict transformation studies and peace and justice studies.

Goshen requires students to participate in intercultural study, and 80 percent of the student body goes abroad through the college’s Study-Service Term (SST). A ground-breaking program that has been offered for more than 40 years, SST destinations are in developing countries, where students live with local host families and focus on intensive language and cultural studies before working on a voluntary service project.

Department chairman:
Dr. Joe Liechty
joecl@goshen.edu
(574) 535-7802