American University

The primary focus of the International Peace and Conflict Resolution program at American University is its extensive and well-regarded graduate programs. The university does, however, offer a joint B.A./M.A. program to outstanding undergraduates enrolled in the School for International Studies. This program allows undergraduates to earn graduate credits and move directly to the master’s program, which they can then complete in a shorter amount of time than otherwise.

The International Peace and Conflict Resolution program is “concerned with understanding the causes of war and organized violence, developing strategies for resolving conflict, and constructing conditions for peace.” A significant aspect of the program’s commitment to peace is the Mohammed Said Farsi Chair of Islamic Peace, the “first chair endowed at any university in the United States that is devoted to the study of Islam and peace.”

The International Peace and Conflict Resolution program offers concentrations in Applied Conflict Resolution; Human Rights; Identity and Culture; International Negotiation; Peacebuilding; Regional Concentration; Research and Policy; and a Self-Designed Concentration.

Program Director:
Dr. Anthony Wanis-St. John
wanis@american.edu
(202) 885-1544

Program Coordinator:
Nicole Smith
peace@american.edu
(202) 885-1622

 

Eastern Mennonite University

Nonviolence, social justice and positive societal change are emphasized across the university’s entire curriculum and in its mission statement, as befits a university that maintains strong ties to one of the traditional “peace churches,” the Mennonite Church. Yet the university is clearly committed to educating people of all faiths in peacemaking theory and practice, as shown by its Center for Interfaith Engagement .

The undergraduate major in peacebuilding and development includes core studies of the theory and practice of social justice and social change, plus a series of classes in philosophy, political science, economics and contemporary issues of peace and justice. Many of the professors in the program, and the university in general, have lived in other countries and demonstrate commitment “to work for justice at home and around the world.” Majors must also complete a practicum, often through the Washington (D.C.) Community Scholars Program.

Eastern Mennonite University also offers a five-year accelerated MA in Conflict Transformation degree in collaboration with its Center for Justice and Peacebuilding (CJP). CJP offers a graduate program that draws peace practitioners from around the world to campus (Nobel Peace Laureate Leymah Gbowee is a graduate). It sponsors a variety of other peace and justice programs and initiatives, including an annual Summer Peacebuilding Institute, which hosts between 150 to 200 people from around 40 countries. With more than 2,800 participants in its 20 years of existence, SPI has initiated several similar initiatives around the world, 12 of which were featured in a 2015 issue of Peacebuilder magazine.

Founded in 1917, Eastern Mennonite University was an early proponent of requiring all students to participate in cross-cultural studies; the majority of students spend a semester abroad through one of the university’s many cross-cultural programs. 

Contact:

EMU Undergrad Admissions Dept., (800) EMU-COOL
-or- CJP Graduate Admissions, cjp@emu.edu, (540) 432-4490

George Mason University

For more than 30 years, faculty, students, and alumni of the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University have been committed to addressing justice and peace issues through rigorous academic programs and innovative research and practice. Our undergraduate program offers a B.A., B.S., minor, and Accelerated Master’s degree. Undergraduates learn to address deep-rooted conflicts and work toward their resolution at the interpersonal, community/organizational, and global levels. Students analyze conflict from multiple perspectives and pursue a uniquely designed concentration of elective courses chosen from across the humanities and social sciences.

Experiential learning, undergraduate research, study abroad, internships, and extracurricular activities are enhanced by our proximity to the nation’s capital and provide students the opportunity to gain practical, real-world experience in the Washington, D.C. metro area. Our focus on developing students’ abilities in analysis, writing, inquiry, problem solving, and conflict resolution skills equips graduates with sought-after job skills and prepares them for placement in a wide variety of careers and graduate programs in business, law, government and public administration, international policy and diplomacy, education, community and global development, health, and the social sciences.

Program director:
Dr. Mara Schoeny
ugradcar@gmu.edu
(703) 993-4165

 

 

 

 

 

Guilford College

Guilford College’s historical affiliation with the Quaker church is a significant influence on its peace and conflict studies program. Students are encouraged to examine conflicts’ roots, engage in an individual search for truth, embrace nonviolent social change,  and learn practical problem-solving skills. The major in peace and conflict studies includes a series of core courses, a variety of relevant elective classes from related academic departments, and an internship. A peace and conflict studies minor is also available.

Guilford College’s Conflict Resolution Center is an on-campus resource that exists to address conflicts that arise between members of the campus community. The center offers students in the peace and conflict studies department an opportunity for practical experience using conflict resolution methods drawn from the school’s Quaker heritage: “understanding, listening and cooperation.”

Department chair:
Amal Khoury
khouryai@guilford.edu
(336) 316-2840

Salisbury University

The Center for Conflict Resolution at Salisbury University exists to “effectively promote and foster nonviolent, collaborative and peaceful ways to resolve conflicts,” working through community outreach, research and practice, in addition to its academic programs. The center offers a conflict analysis and dispute resolution major, designed as a pre-professional program for undergraduate students who want to pursue careers or graduate study in conflict intervention.

Ten courses are required for the major, including five core requirements and two upper-level electives largely focusing on conflict theory, analysis and resolution techniques. The remaining classes allow majors to develop a concentration in one of three different levels of conflict: international; intergroup/organizational; and interpersonal. Majors must also fulfill internship and field research requirements that can be completed locally, nationally or internationally.

Salisbury also offers a five-course conflict analysis and dispute resolution minor, as well as a new, two-year M.A. program. One of the university’s official clubs is the conflict resolution club, open to any students; it also hosts an annual lecture series that brings to campus notable leaders and activists in nonviolence, social change and conflict resolution.

Department chair: Dr. Ignaciyas Soosaipillai
conflictresolution@salisbury.edu
(410) 219-2873